TIP05: Finding difference in the same subject: snowdrops

March 14, 2018  •  Leave a Comment

There are many ways to understand which season we’re in, even though in the UK it can be confusing when grey cold wet days can assail you in summer. 

You can:  a) look out of the window b) look at a calendar c) look at your photofeed on websites like Flickr.

If you have an account on a photo sharing site, I can guarantee at certain times of the year you’ll be inundated with the same things.  I'm also guilty, I will take and post these shots too!  For example:

  • February:  Snowdrops
  • March: Daffodils
  • April: Tulips
  • Late Summer: Hay bails
  • Autumn: close up of fallen leaves
  • Etc…

You get the general idea! 

Overexposure of the subjects (pun intended),  I do it, we all do it.  Most of us are not professional photogs, so we take what we can when we can and yes, these things are beautiful so, when they are there, naturally we take photos of them!

My tip, if you get too many of them in your photo feed, don’t follow so many people J or don’t look at it…or just don’t worry about it.  Plenty of other things in life to worry about after all...

Whichever J  Personally, although the similarity of subject matter can be a bit monotonous, use it to your advantage!  Look at all those shots, what do they have in common? Which are the better ones? What makes them different? Why are they better? 

You can see where this is going...

By understanding what makes one shot stand out above the rest, you can improve your own technique and your eye for composition.  Improve yourself!

Now, I am not saying that the pictures of snowdrops below are particularly special, actually far from it, but, by looking at many shots I tried to find a different approach.  Compare the two.  Which do you think is better?  Why?  The first was taken in 2016, the second, 2018.  Just by examining two shots you’ll start thinking about your own images in a new way, and that can only help you find more compositions to try in future.

She who hangs her headShe who hangs her headSnowdrops always look sad...

She who hangs her head, snowdrops Feb 2016, f/2.8, 1/1000, 105mm macro, ISO400

Snowy snowdropsSnowy snowdropsA snow covered snow drop

Snow drops on snowdrops Jan 2018, f/5.6, 1/500, 105mm macro, ISO1250

(a very windy day, high ISO used to combat movement)

Share links here to your images of snowdrops…or other similar objects that suffer seasonal overexposure.  Let’s have a look!

Best wishes

The Frustrated Photog.


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